stock-channel.net - Aktien Links Stocks Rohstoffe Trading Handel Exchange
stock-channel.net - The Art Of Trading Home Analysen IR-Center Finanznews Finanzlinks Mediathek Diskussion Kontakt

Zurück   stock-channel.net - Das Finanzportal > Daily Talk
Benutzername
Kennwort
Registrieren FAQ Benutzerliste Kalender Foren als gelesen markieren Reload
Aktuelle Uhrzeit 14:24

Antwort Gehe zum letzten Beitrag
 
Themen-Optionen
Alt 20.07.2006, 21:59   #31
waldmaus
stock-channel.net member
 
Registrierungsdatum: Oct 2005
Beiträge: 445
Standard

Deflation Strawman


Once again Steve Saville is at it.

In The Main Flaw in the Deflation Case he proposes a strawman that simply does not exist. It amazes me that after everything that deflationists such as myself have written, that not a single inflationist can accurately state the deflationist point of view.

They continually build and attack deflation cases that as best as I can tell, no one has proposed. Time and time again we go through this. It is tiring. Some have proposed that Saville was referring to me in that article but rest assured I have not been talking about deflation for more than two years. Regardless, here is the latest strawman:
A theme that appears to be common to the most eloquent arguments in favour of a deflationary outcome is that consumers, at some point, will have to start reducing their collective indebtedness, and when this happens the total supply of money and credit will begin to contract (deflation will occur). Given the current enormous height of the collective debt burden it seems likely that the point at which the debt accumulation of consumers tops out cannot be far off, which is, we think, why the idea that the world is about to plunge into a deflationary quagmire has proved to be so seductive. After all, there must be some limit to how much debt people will be able or willing to take-on and, with the savings rate in negative territory and debt repayments constituting an uncommonly-high proportion of disposable income, we simply MUST be close to that limit.

The problem is, the argument for deflation outlined in the above paragraph is based on the incorrect premise that the consumer is the engine of inflation. And when you start with an incorrect premise and then apply perfect logic you are GUARANTEED to come to the wrong conclusion.

The central bank, not the consumer, has always been and always will be the engine of inflation.
Let's stop right there.

In In Praise of Saville I said:
It sure is nice to see someone properly explain what inflation is, what it is not, and why measuring the CPI is fraught with so many problems as to make it useless. Steve [Saville] wrote:

The correct definition of inflation is an increase in the supply of money that CAUSES a decrease in the purchasing power of money, but we usually define it as simply an increase in the supply of money. This is done, in part, for the practical reason that it's impossible to measure changes in the purchasing power of money on an economy-wide basis.

It is not possible to measure changes in the overall purchasing power of money because it is not possible to come up with a meaningful number that represents the average price level within an economy. There are, of course, price indices such as the CPI that purportedly represent the average price level, but these indices are generally worse than useless because they are calculated in such a way that they are guaranteed to paint a misleading picture.
I have on numerous occasions said that inflation was an increase in money supply and credit. How many times do we have to say it? It really gets tiring. I am glad that Saville agrees because unless one can agree on a definition, then there can be no meaningful debate.

I agree with Saville that the consumer is not the source of inflation.
So why does Saville post the strawman that he did?
Perhaps he was responding to someone else. If so who?
That is another problem with many inflationists. They attack ideas that as best as I can tell no one said. If someone said the consumer is the source of inflation then who was it? I will agree with Saville that idea is absurd. I will also tell Saville that is not the basis for most deflationist beliefs. It's easy to attack a strawman that does not exist.

Does that mean the consumer is out of the picture?
No, of course not. That is what Saville does not seem to understand.
Banks can print but they can not force consumers to either borrow or spend. If bankruptcies expand faster than borrowing, the net of money supply and credit will contract. That is deflation.

There is one other twist that I have talked about and that is the velocity of money.

In Inflation: What the heck is it? I wrote:
Some argue that Japan never went through deflation. One basis for that argument is that "money supply" as measured by M1 never contracted over a sustained period. The other argument is that prices as measured by the CPI never fell much. Once again we have a flawed argument about consumer prices and a flawed argument that only looks at money and not credit.

Although Japan was rapidly printing money, a destruction of credit was happening at a far greater pace. There was an overall contraction of credit in Japan for close to 5 consecutive years. Property values plunged for 18 consecutive years. The stock market plunged from 40,000 to 7,000. Cash was hoarded and the velocity of money collapsed. Those are classic symptoms of deflation that a proper definition incorporating both money supply and credit would readily catch. Those looking at consumer prices or monetary injections by the bank of Japan were far off the mark.
Now given that we hopefully agree on what inflation and deflation are, we can discard the strawman that Saville proposed.

The question then is to what extent the Fed can prolong that monetary expansion if consumers refuse to borrow or banks refuse to lend.

In that respect the consumer IS the key.
It is a key the Fed can not control.

Japan printed money for years and no one wanted it.
Yes, the US is different than Japan. We are far worse off and much deeper in debt. That adds to the deflationist case.
Wage fundamentals are much worse now especially with outsourcing and the internet. That adds to the deflationist case.
Ultimately it comes down to the question of "will the banks destroy themselves and their wealth" to bail out consumers deep in debt.

The answer to that question is "Of course not. Why would they?"
I have heard time and time again that banks can at will cause hyperinflation.
I have admitted that yes they can in theory, time and time and time again.

The real question is then is: "Will they"?
That is what we are debating. We are not debating if they can, we are debating the likelihood of it happening.
I have heard all of the inflation answers before.

We have not had deflation since 1930 and will never see it again.
The Fed will bail out consumers.
The Fed will do this.
The Fed will do that.

It seems that everyone feels the Fed is all powerful, and that the Fed can defeat the business cycle by forever printing money.
That is the fallacy of the inflationist arguments.
It can not be done. The root cause of the great depression was an overexpansion of money and credit. "Helicopter Drop Bernanke" could no more cure that by printing more money than I could take on Michael Jordan in one on one basketball at his prime.

So why has there been persistent inflation since 1940? The answer to that is the k-cycle. Please read The Kondratieff Cycle Revisited for a more in depth look at the k-cycle.

Three fourths of the cycle there is inflation. Each season is long (18-24 years). By the time we get to deflationary winter, many (most) people that have only known inflation all their lives dismiss the idea. No one believes that deflation can happen. They have seen nothing but inflation all their lives. Prechter's huge mistakes were not allowing sufficient time for each season, and for thinking that gold will fall in deflation.

Yes I agree that the Fed could eventually induce hyperinflation by dropping money out of helicopters. OK, so would they? The reason they would not do so is because it would bail out consumers at the expense of banks. Does anyone really believe the Fed would bail out consumers at their own expense? I don’t.

Yes, I believe they will try to help consumers, not by dropping money out of helicopters but by lowering interest rates. However unless jobs are created, with salaries that will allow consumer debts to be paid off, the Fed loses. Asset bubbles in the stock market and then in housing kept the consumer ready and willing to spend. What's next?

If housing is the bubble of last resort, what would happen if the Fed turned on the pumps? I suspect money would go into gold and silver, but no jobs would be produced, certainly nothing like the housing boom produced. That last sentence should explain why many deflationists like gold. That answer is also why it would be game set and match for the Fed. Yes the Fed could in theory drop money out of helicopters, but only if they wanted to destroy themselves. There is theory and there is practice. If consumers are finally at the end of their ropes as I suspect, inflationists are in for one rude shock.

Mike Shedlock / Mish
http://globaleconomicanalysis.blogspot.com/
waldmaus ist offline   Mit Zitat antworten
Für Inhalt und Rechtmäßigkeit dieses Beitrags trägt der Verfasser waldmaus die alleinige Verantwortung. (s. Haftungshinweis)
Alt 05.08.2006, 17:42   #32
fluctuant
stock-channel.net trader
 
Registrierungsdatum: Jul 2004
Beiträge: 2.092
Standard

Zitat:
Zitat von Förster

an der Währungsreform führt kein Weg dran vorbei. im blödesten Fall
kommt das Elektronische. Seit Visa und "mit dem guten Namen
bezahlen" ist dieser Weg bereits eingeschlagen. Giralgeld rulz. DAS
zuende denken, es an der Zeit für alle gekommen ist.


Hallo Förster,

der gedanke ist nicht schlecht.
Seitdem ich von meinem sohn hörte, dass man bei ebay sogar "charakter" von spielern oder ähnliche dinge kaufen kann. Ist wirklich wahr; es findet da ein reger handel statt.

f.
fluctuant ist offline   Mit Zitat antworten
Für Inhalt und Rechtmäßigkeit dieses Beitrags trägt der Verfasser fluctuant die alleinige Verantwortung. (s. Haftungshinweis)
Alt 03.09.2006, 10:42   #33
Aktienbaer
Bruderschaft der Freimaurer
 
Benutzerbild von Aktienbaer
 
Registrierungsdatum: Mar 2003
Ort: LA
Beiträge: 2.515
Standard

Zitat:
Zitat von Förster

an der Währungsreform führt kein Weg dran vorbei. im blödesten Fall
kommt das Elektronische. Seit Visa und "mit dem guten Namen
bezahlen" ist dieser Weg bereits eingeschlagen. Giralgeld rulz. DAS
zuende denken, es an der Zeit für alle gekommen ist.

moin förster
recht hast du....

Das weltweite Finanzsystem ist wieder mal am Ende seiner Kapazität angelangt. Wie jedes Schneeballsystem stößt der Kapitalismus immer wieder an natürliche Grenzen. Die ganze Welt ist buchstäblich bis zur Halskrause verschuldet und es werden 95% des auf der Erde umherirrenden Kapitals nicht mehr für Warengeschäfte sondern für abstruse Spekulationsgeschäfte verwendet.

Es ist Zeit die Uhr neu zu stellen und den Reset-Knopf zu drücken. Dazu müssen Guthaben und Schulden in großem Umfang vernichtet werden, eine Währungsreform durchgeführt werden und es ist auch vorteilhaft wenn möglichst viel kaputt geht. Mit anderen Worten man braucht einen KRIEG.

Oder einen Bürgerkrieg. Oder beides. Das Problem ist nur, daß man vermeiden muß, daß ein globaler Atomkrieg daraus wird, dann geht eventuell ZUVIEL kaputt.

Deswegen ist "der Islam" so gut als Gegner geeignet. Nicht nur wegen dem Öl, sondern auch weil man mittels der muslimischen Minderheiten in Europa wunderbar Bürgerkriege, Pogrome und was weiß ich noch anzetteln kann. Dabei geht ordentlich was kaputt, Deutschland und viele andere europäischen Staaten lösen nebenbei ihr Renter - und Gesundheitsproblem, weil die ganzen Rentner, Pflegefälle, Diabetiker und sonst chronisch Kranken mit auf der Strecke bleiben und hinterher dürfen dann die überlebenden wieder neu anfangen.

Die kleine Kaste die vorher schon steinreich war ist selbstverständlich danach immer noch steinreich und kommt meist auch völlig ungeschoren davon.

Und am Ende gibts neues Geld - Diesmal wahrscheinlich eine von den USA bzw. deren Finanzoligarchen kontrollierte Weltwährung - (den GLOBO :-)) Vielleicht nutzt man dann auch die Gelegenheit, absolut terrorgeschütztes elektronisches Geld auf Chipkarten einzuführen, die unter die Haut implantiert werden...


PS: vor ein paar Jahren fragte mich so ein Typ an der Kasse im Bauhaus, warum ich zwei Tressore kaufe...
...ich sagte Ihm, da bewahre ich meine Zukunft drin auf.
Ich glaube der Typ denkt immer noch darüber nach, was ich damit meinte




http://www.falschgeld-infopoint.de/teuer.htm
__________________
Ein Optimist ist in der Regel ein Zeitgenosse, der ungenügend informiert ist.
Aktienbaer ist offline   Mit Zitat antworten
Für Inhalt und Rechtmäßigkeit dieses Beitrags trägt der Verfasser Aktienbaer die alleinige Verantwortung. (s. Haftungshinweis)
Alt 03.09.2006, 11:50   #34
Aktienbaer
Bruderschaft der Freimaurer
 
Benutzerbild von Aktienbaer
 
Registrierungsdatum: Mar 2003
Ort: LA
Beiträge: 2.515
Standard





es ist schon komisch, sich vorzustellen, wenn die dritte Welt ihre Kokosnüsse mit der Amexo-Karte bezahlt
__________________
Ein Optimist ist in der Regel ein Zeitgenosse, der ungenügend informiert ist.
Aktienbaer ist offline   Mit Zitat antworten
Für Inhalt und Rechtmäßigkeit dieses Beitrags trägt der Verfasser Aktienbaer die alleinige Verantwortung. (s. Haftungshinweis)
Alt 19.06.2007, 14:00   #35
Zwerg
stock-channel.net trader
 
Registrierungsdatum: Nov 2004
Ort: Fulda
Beiträge: 1.773
Standard

Zitat:
Zitat von pit

http://www.goldseiten.de/content/ko...php?storyid=384


Rethi sagt, Deflation ist Folge von Inflation. Der Hund wackelt mit dem Schwanz, nicht umgekehrt. Geh ich eins mit.

Es gibt ein gutes Argument gegen eine (baldige) Hyperinflation.

Wenn wirklich eine Hyperinflation geplant ist, warum schwätzen sie dann den Leuten in den Aktienverkaufsfernsehsendern ohne Ende Aktien auf. Seit wann sind die, die hier die Geldpolitik machen und die alle Massenmedien kontrollieren, plötzlich Menschenfreunde geworden.

Würde wirklich eine Hyperinflation geplant sein, dann würde das n-tv Programm ganz anders aussehen.
__________________
Wer nicht wagt, der nicht gewinnt

Geändert von Zwerg (19.06.2007 um 14:06 Uhr).
Zwerg ist offline   Mit Zitat antworten
Für Inhalt und Rechtmäßigkeit dieses Beitrags trägt der Verfasser Zwerg die alleinige Verantwortung. (s. Haftungshinweis)
Alt 24.06.2007, 21:34   #36
MillenniumBroker
Breakfast of Champions - River side con.
 
Benutzerbild von MillenniumBroker
 
Registrierungsdatum: Sep 2001
Beiträge: 3.764
Standard

Zitat:
Zitat von Zwerg

Es gibt ein gutes Argument gegen eine (baldige) Hyperinflation.

Wenn wirklich eine Hyperinflation geplant ist, warum schwätzen sie dann den Leuten in den Aktienverkaufsfernsehsendern ohne Ende Aktien auf. Seit wann sind die, die hier die Geldpolitik machen und die alle Massenmedien kontrollieren, plötzlich Menschenfreunde geworden.

Würde wirklich eine Hyperinflation geplant sein, dann würde das n-tv Programm ganz anders aussehen.

Ist eine Hyperinflation was Geplantes?
__________________
Follow the course opposite to custom and you will almost always be right
MillenniumBroker ist offline   Mit Zitat antworten
Für Inhalt und Rechtmäßigkeit dieses Beitrags trägt der Verfasser MillenniumBroker die alleinige Verantwortung. (s. Haftungshinweis)
Alt 24.04.2008, 22:19   #37
Cashflow
stock-channel.net trader
 
Benutzerbild von Cashflow
 
Registrierungsdatum: Dec 2004
Beiträge: 1.418
Standard

In 10 Jahren? 2018.

Da kriegst Du eine LED-Anzeige mit deinem credit score an die Stirn getackert, damit der Typ hinterm MCD-Tresen weiß, ob du dir den Burger auch leisten kannst.


Geändert von Cashflow (25.04.2008 um 21:44 Uhr).
Cashflow ist offline   Mit Zitat antworten
Für Inhalt und Rechtmäßigkeit dieses Beitrags trägt der Verfasser Cashflow die alleinige Verantwortung. (s. Haftungshinweis)
Alt 25.01.2012, 22:38   #38
LDiablo
SCN Kontraindikator
 
Benutzerbild von LDiablo
 
Registrierungsdatum: Jan 2002
Ort:
Beiträge: 5.160
Standard

Mein Gott, fünf Jahre her seit letztem posting und ausser ein bischen bankenkrise hat die deutsche Börsengemeinde noch nichts neues erlebt

OK Euro-Krise und ESM ESFS und Staatsbankrott, aber der Dax steht auch nicht gross woanders, nur das mit dem Gold gibt einem zu denken

Da sind die Aktien weit hinten dran, aber von Hyperinflation, Weltkrieg und totalem Aktiencrash ist weit und breit nix zu sehen und auch die Währungen sind noch alle da

Der Thread ist also noch genauso aktuell wie zur Eröffnung, und daher habe ich ihn wieder hervorgekramt
__________________
Phantasie ist wichtiger als Wissen, denn Wissen ist begrenzt. (Albert Einstein)
LDiablo ist offline   Mit Zitat antworten
Für Inhalt und Rechtmäßigkeit dieses Beitrags trägt der Verfasser LDiablo die alleinige Verantwortung. (s. Haftungshinweis)
Alt 25.01.2012, 22:43   #39
LDiablo
SCN Kontraindikator
 
Benutzerbild von LDiablo
 
Registrierungsdatum: Jan 2002
Ort:
Beiträge: 5.160
Standard

Zitat:
Zitat von liquido

@all

Meine persönliche Meinung zur kompletten Thematik !!!

man sollte die Selbstheilungskräfte des Systems nicht unterschätzen !

D.h. es gibt keinen zwingenden Grund, dass das heutige Geldsystem sich in eine Hyperinflation oder Deflation "aufschwingt".

Rohstoffverteuerung treibt sicherlich die Inflation hoch - die daraus entstehende Verteuerung der Güter schwächt wiederum den Kosum ab und wirkt somit dagegen. Dieses System ist träge und schwingt daher in gewissen Konjunkturzyklen, die der Investor mittelfristig "traden" kann ( Hausse und Baisse-Zyklen ). Der Erfolg hängt daher davon ab, dass man sich Instrumente entwickelt, die diese Zyklen erkennen und einen zum handeln bewegen. Dies ist durch die Phsysche des Menschen schon schwer genug.

Durch Innovation und Fortschritt wird die Menschheit eine immer höhere Produktivität erzielen, sodass Wohlstand und Lebensqualität auch in den nächsten 500 Jahren immer weiter ansteigt. Dies ist schon seit mehreren Tausend Jahren so !!!

Sicherlich schadet es nichts, wenn man sich einen Notgroschen aneignet. Dieser kann natürlich z.T. aus Edelmetallen bestehen. Aber man sollte sich nicht vom eigentlichen "Leben" abwenden und pausenlos an irgendwelche Untergangsszenarien arbeiten. Dies macht auf die Dauer krank und einsam !

Gruß Liquido

Aus heutiger Sicht muss man sagen dass liquido richtig lag

Ist aber immer nur eine Momentaufnahme
__________________
Phantasie ist wichtiger als Wissen, denn Wissen ist begrenzt. (Albert Einstein)
LDiablo ist offline   Mit Zitat antworten
Für Inhalt und Rechtmäßigkeit dieses Beitrags trägt der Verfasser LDiablo die alleinige Verantwortung. (s. Haftungshinweis)
Alt 23.04.2012, 10:35   #40
liquido
stock-channel.net starter
 
Registrierungsdatum: Jan 2002
Beiträge: 41
Standard

@LDiablo

danke für die späte Ehre ;-)

Meinen Beitrag aus dem Jahr 2006 würde ich heute nicht so optimistisch formulieren. Insbesondere sehe ich derzeit ein massives gesellschaftliches Problem auf uns zukommen. Dies wird in Zukunft unser System kippen. Also aufpassen, aber wem sage ich das!

Das Problem liegt darin, dass der Fortschritt und der damit verbundene Produktivitätsgewinn leider immer weniger Menschen/Volkswirtschaften zu Gute kommt. Das Vermögen konzentriert sich auf immer kleinere Bevölkerungsanteile. Desweiteren werden insbesondere für junge Menschen keine Perspektiven geschaffen, obwohl es immer mehr alterbedingte Ruheständler gibt. Die derzeitigen Unterschiede im Euroraum oder die Machtwechsel in Nordafrika sind dabei nur ein kleiner Vorgeschmack auf die Zukunft.

Ich gebe dem System nur noch 5-10 Jahre. Dann wird es große Verwerfungen geben. Ein Reset des Systems ist systembedingt unausweichlich und wird viele Tränen kosten.
__________________
Gruß Liquido
liquido ist offline   Mit Zitat antworten
Für Inhalt und Rechtmäßigkeit dieses Beitrags trägt der Verfasser liquido die alleinige Verantwortung. (s. Haftungshinweis)
Alt 23.04.2012, 13:01   #41
Kojak
stock-channel.net trader
 
Benutzerbild von Kojak
 
Registrierungsdatum: Dec 2009
Beiträge: 3.895
Standard

Immer wieder gibt der Mensch Geld aus, das er nicht hat, für Dinge, die er nicht braucht, um damit Leuten zu imponieren, die er nicht mag.


Wer den ganzen Tag arbeitet, hat keine Zeit, Geld zu verdienen.


Der einzige Weg, um das Verhalten der Politiker zu ändern, ist, ihnen das Geld wegzunehmen.


Die Börse schwankt zwischen Gier und Angst. Angst, alles zu verlieren, und der Gier, noch mehr Geld zu machen.


Wenn man kein Geld hat, denkt man immer an Geld. Wenn man viel Geld hat, denkt man nur noch an Geld.


Musik bringt dich besser durch Zeiten ohne Geld, als Geld dich durch Zeiten ohne Musik bringt.



Geld macht sicher nicht glücklich, aber wenn ich traurig bin, weine ich lieber in einem schönen Auto als auf einem alten Fahrrad.


Ein Geschäft, das nur Geld einbringt, ist ein schlechtes Geschäft.


Keine Festung ist so stark, dass Geld sie nicht einnehmen kann.


Erst beim Verfassen der Steuererklärung kommt man dahinter, wieviel Geld man sparen würde, wenn man gar keines hätte.


Jede Wirtschaft beruht auf dem Kreditsystem, das heißt auf der irrtümlichen Annahme, der andere werde gepumptes Geld zurückzahlen.


Wer der Meinung ist, dass man für Geld alles haben kann, gerät leicht in den Verdacht, dass er für Geld alles zu tun bereit ist.


Gläubiger haben ein besseres Gedächtnis als Schuldner.


Willst du den Wert des Geldes kennenlernen, geh und versuche dir welches zu borgen.


Es ist schmerzlich auf soviel Geld zu sitzen. Aber noch schmerzlicher ist es, etwas Dummes damit anzustellen.


An der Börse gibt's nur Schmerzensgeld. Erst kommen die Schmerzen, dann das Geld!
Kojak ist offline   Mit Zitat antworten
Für Inhalt und Rechtmäßigkeit dieses Beitrags trägt der Verfasser Kojak die alleinige Verantwortung. (s. Haftungshinweis)
Alt 10.01.2013, 23:05   #42
finanzmeister
stock-channel.net starter
 
Benutzerbild von finanzmeister
 
Registrierungsdatum: Jan 2013
Beiträge: 9
Standard

Zitat:
Wer den ganzen Tag arbeitet, hat keine Zeit, Geld zu verdienen.


Dieser Satz stimmt auf so vielen Ebenen! Viele stecken einfach in einem Hamsterrad fest und kommen da nicht mehr so leicht raus :-(
__________________
Immer auf der Suche nach dem optimalen Portfoilio...
finanzmeister ist offline   Mit Zitat antworten
Für Inhalt und Rechtmäßigkeit dieses Beitrags trägt der Verfasser finanzmeister die alleinige Verantwortung. (s. Haftungshinweis)
Alt 19.06.2013, 09:49   #43
rhodos
stock-channel.net starter
 
Registrierungsdatum: Jun 2013
Beiträge: 3
Standard

Ich rechne eher mit einer jahrzehntelanger Deflation wie in Japan. Lohnsenkungen,"Sparpolitik" und Abbau der Sozialfürsorge können nur dazu führen.
rhodos ist offline   Mit Zitat antworten
Für Inhalt und Rechtmäßigkeit dieses Beitrags trägt der Verfasser rhodos die alleinige Verantwortung. (s. Haftungshinweis)
Alt 28.05.2014, 17:09   #44
sebi11
stock-channel.net starter
 
Registrierungsdatum: May 2014
Beiträge: 4
Standard

die EZB hat es in den letzten Jahrn gut geschafft die Inflation bei knapp unter 2 Prozent zu halten und wird es auch in Zukunft schaffen
__________________
ich lebe für den Sport
sebi11 ist offline   Mit Zitat antworten
Für Inhalt und Rechtmäßigkeit dieses Beitrags trägt der Verfasser sebi11 die alleinige Verantwortung. (s. Haftungshinweis)
Antwort Gehe zum letzten Beitrag



Themen-Optionen

Gehe zu



Aktuelle Uhrzeit 14:24
Powered by: vBulletin Version 3.0.3
Copyright ©2000 - 2018, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.
Copyright © stock-channel.net